Oxygen

OXYGEN

Source: Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

o2panel

 

*** SECTION 1. CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION ***

CHEMINFO RECORD NUMBER : 64
CCOHS CHEMICAL NAME : Oxygen gas
SYNONYMS :
*Oxygene
*Oxygen,compressed
CAS REGISTRY NUMBER :7782-44-7
PIN (UN/NA NUMBER(S) :1072
RTECS NUMBER(S) :RS2060000
CHEMICAL FAMILY :Molecular oxygen
MOLECULAR FORMULA :O2

*** SECTION 2. DESCRIPTION ***

APPEARANCE AND ODOUR :

Colourless, odourless gas

COMPOSITION/PURITY :
Commercial oxygen may contain up to 1% argon and traces of
nitrogen.

USES AND OCCURRENCES:

Forms 21% of atmosphere by volume. Used in refining of metals
(e.g.blast furnaces; copper smelting; steel production). Starting
material in chemical production. Used medically in resuscitation;
heart stimulant; decompression chamber. Oxidation of municipal
and industrial organic wastes; to counteract effect of eutrophi
cation in lakes and reservoirs.

*** SECTION 3. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION ***

** POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS **

EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM (ACUTE) EXPOSURE:

INHALATION:

Normal air contains 21% oxygen. No health effects have been
observed in humans exposed to oxygen at concentrations up to 80%
for a few hours nor at concentrations up to 50% for 24 hours or
longer. Oxygen at pressure above 1 atmosphere can have toxic
effects which appear after 2-6 hours of exposure. The respiratory
system and central nervous system are primarily affected. Pulmo
nary symptoms of oxygen toxicity include tightness in the chest,
intense burning pain and uncontrollable coughing spasms. Reduced
lung function is the earliest measurable sign of toxicity. Other
symptoms include fever,sinusitis, conjunctivitis, vomiting and
extreme fatigue. The central nervous system effects(CNS) of
oxygen appear more quickly than the pulmonary symptoms, but only
under a higher oxygen pressure. Industrial exposures to high
oxygen pressures are uncommon. Deep sea divers, caisson workers,
and tunnel workers may be exposed to pressures that are high
enough to cause damage. CNS effects from exposure to high pres
sures of oxygen include mood changes, nausea, dizziness, muscular
twitching, convulsions and loss of consciousness, The effects are
reversible.

SKIN CONTACT:

No known effects

EYE CONTACT:

No known effects

INGESTION:

Not applicable

EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM(CHRONIC) EXPOSURE:

INHALATION:
Chronic exposures to high atmospheric concentrations
of oxygen at normal pressure or elevated pressure may produce
severe thickening and scarring of lung tissues.

CARCINOGENICITY:
Not carcinogenic

TERATOGENICITY AND EMBRYOTOXICITY:
In sufficient data

MUTAGENICITY:
Not mugagenic

*** SECTION 4. FIRST AID MEASURES ***

INHALATION:
If symptoms are experienced, remove source of contamination or
move victim to fresh air. Obtain medical attention immediately.

SKIN CONTACT:
Not applicable

EYE CONTACT
Not applicable

INGESTION:
Not applicable

FIRST AID COMMENTS:
Provide general supportive measures (comfort, warmth, rest)
Consult a physician and/or the nearest poison Control Centre if
symptoms are experienced. All first aid procedures should be
periodically reviewed by a physician familiar with the material
and its conditions of use in the workplace.

SECTION 5. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES ***

FLASH POINT:
Not combustible (does not burn). However, pure oxygen gas is a
strong oxidizing agent and is a serious fire and explosion risk.

LOWER FLAMMABLE (EXPLOSIVE) LIMIT (LFL/LEL):
Not applicable

AUTO IGNITION(IGNITION) TEMPERATURE:
Not applicable

COMBUSTION AND THERMAL DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS:
Oxides of materials which are burning.

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA:
Use extinguisher appropriate for the material which is burning.

FIRE FIGHTING INSTRUCTIONS:
Move containers from fire area if it can be done without risk.
Stay away from ends of tanks. Use water to cool fire-exposed
containers. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sounds from
venting safety device or any discolouration of tanks due to fire.
For massive fire in cargo area, use unmanned hose holder or
monitor nozzles; if this is impossible, withdraw from area and
let fire burn. NOTE: Atmosphere with oxygen concentrations great
er than 21% pose a serious fire and explosion risk. May ignite
combustibles (wood,paper,oil,clothing). Most vapours are heavier
than air. Mixtures with fuel may explode. Containers may explode
in heat or fire.

*** SECTION 6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES ***

PRECAUTIONS:
Restrict access to area until completion of cleanup. Keep
combustibles (wood,paper,oil,etc.) away from source of leak.
Eliminate all ignition sources. Ensure cleanup is conducted by
trained personnel only. Provide adequate personal protective
equipment. ventilate area. Contact manufacturer/supplier for
advice.

CLEAN-UP:
Stop leak if it can be done without risk. Isolate area until gas
has dispersed.

*** SECTION 7. HANDLING AND STORAGE ***

HANDLING:
Use in minimal quantities in designated areas with adequate
ventilation. Have emergency equipment (for fires,spills,leaks,
etc.) readily available.

Transport cylinders by hand truck or cart designed for that
purpose. Do not lift cylinders by their caps and do not handle
them with oily hands. Secure cylinders in place, in an upright
position at all times. Do not drop cylinders or permit them to
strike each other. Leave valve cap on cylinder until cylinder is
secured and ready for use. Close all valves when not in actual
use.

STORAGE:
Store in a cool, dry,well-ventilated area, out of direct sun
light and away from heat and ignition sources. Store at least 25
feet from flammable/combustible materials. Store cylinders
upright on a level, fireproof floor,secured in position and
protected from damage. Keep cylinder valve cover on. Keep cylin
der free from hydrocarbons such as oil or grease, Label empty
cylinders. Store full cylinders separately from empty cylinders.
Cylinder temperature should never exceed 51 deg C (125 deg F).
Limit quantity of material in storage. Restrict access to storage
area. Post warning signs when appropriate. Keep storage area
separate from populated work areas. Inspect periodically for
deficiencies.

*** SECTION 8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION ***

NOTE: Exposure to this material can be controlled in many ways.
The measures appropriates for a particular work site depend on
how this material is used and on the extent of exposure. This
general information can be used to help develop specific control
measures. Ensure that control systems are properly designed and
maintained. Comply with occupational, environmental, fire, and
other applicable regulations.

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS:
COLORIMETRIC-INDICATING(DETECTOR) TUBES: Commercially available.
DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTS: Oxygen monitoring devices are commer
cially available.

Sampling should only be done by trained personnel using appro
priate instrumentation and sampling strategy (location,
timing,duration,frequency, and number of samples). Interpretation
of the sampling results is related to these variables and the
analytical method.

ENGINEERING CONTROLS:
Ventilation Requirements: Provide dilution (general) ventilation
to maintain the atmospheric oxygen concentration near 21%.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT:
Respiratory protective equipment is not ordinarily required.

FACE PROTECTION:
No specific requirement, but it is good practice to wear chemi
cal safety goggles.
SKIN PROTECTION:
Not applicable

EXPOSURE GUIDELINES

*THRESHOLD LIMIT VALUES (TLVs)/AMERICAN CONFERENCE OF GOVERNMEN
TAL INDUSTRIAL HYGIENISTS (ACGIH) / 1992-93*

TIME-WEIGHTED AVERAGE (TLV-TWA) : Not established
TLV COMMENTS:
NOTE: In many Canadian jurisdictions, exposure limits are similar
to the ACGIH TLVs> No TLV has been established for this material.
Since the manner in which exposure limits are established, inter
preted and implemented can vary,obtain detailed information from
the appropriate government agency in each jurisdiction.

*PERMISSIBLE EXPOSURE LIMITS(PELs)/
FINAL RULE LIMITS / OCCUPATIONAL
SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA)*

TIME WEIGHTED AVERAGE (PEL -TWA) : Not established

NOTE: The OSHA PEL Final Limits are currently
non-enforceable due to a court decision. The OSHA
PEL Transitional Limits are now in force.

*PERMISSIBLE EXPOSURE LIMITS(PELs)
TRANSITIONAL LIMITS / OCCUPATIONAL
SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA) *

TIME WEIGHTED AVERAGE (PEL-TWA) : Not established

*** SECTION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES ***

MOLECULAR WEIGHT
CONVERSION FACTOR : : 32.0
1 ppm = 1.33 mg/m3; 1 mg/m3 = 0.75 ppm at 25 deg C
MELTING POINT : -218 deg C (-360 deg F)
BOILING POINT : -183 deg C (-297 deg F)
RELATIVE DENSITY (SPECIFIC GRAVITY):
1.14 at -183 deg C (water = 1)
SOLUBILITY IN WATER:
5 mL of water at 0 deg C
SOLUBILITY IN OTHER LIQUIDS:
Soluble in ethanol and other organic liquids.
VAPOUR DENSITY : 1.105 (air=1)
VAPOUR PRESSURE : Not applicable
SATURATION VAPOUR CONCENTRATION : Not applicable
EVAPORATION RATE : Not applicable
pH VALUE : Not applicable
CRITICAL TEMPERATURE : – 118.6 deg C (-181.4 deg F )
OTHER PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:
CRITICAL PRESSURE: 5,043 kPa (49.72 atm)

*** SECTION 10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY ***

STABILITY :
Stable

HAZARDOUS POLYMERIZATION:
Does not occur

HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS:
None

INCOMPATIBILITY – MATERIALS TO AVOID :
COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS : – increased risk of fire and explosion
ACETALDEHYDE readily oxidized BORON COMPOUNDS (DIBORANCE,PENTA
BORANE, DIBORON TETRAFLUORIDE)- can react explosively ETHERS –
can form explosive hydroperoxides PHOSPHINE – can combine explo
sively PHOSPHOROUS TRIBROMIDE – oxidation reaction can be explo
sive PHOSPHOROUS TRIOXIDE – interaction is rapid and ignition may
occur at elevated temperatures and high concentrations of oxygen
TETRAFLUOROTHYLENE – mixture of oxygen gas with unstablized
liquid tetradluoroethylene produces an explosive polymeric perox
ide

CORROSIVITY TO METALS:
Not corrosive

*** SECTION 11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION ***
INHALATION (rat): Neonatal and adult rats were exposed to 96-98%
oxygen. Rats up to about 36 days old survived a 72-hour exposure
time; most rats older than 50 days died.
INHALATION (dog): Dogs exposed to 75-100% oxygen showed signs of
acute inflammation of the trachea and bronchi.
INHALATION (mouse): Newborn mice exposed to oxygen at 1 at
mosphere pressure (100%) for six weeks showed signs of progres
sive formation of dense fibrous tissue, chronic bronchitis and
bronchiolitis; 18% of the animals survived the six-week exposure.
Almost total mortality of adult mice would be expected within 8
days of such exposure.

*** SECTION 12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION ***
NOTE: This section is under development.

*** SECTION 13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS ***
Allow gas to dissipate safely into the atmosphere. Return damaged
containers to supplier.

*** SECTION 14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION ***
**TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS(TDG) SHIPPING INFORMATION
**
SHIPPING NAME AND DESCRIPTION : Oxygen,compressed or oxygen
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (PIN) : 1072
CLASSIFICATION: 2.2 – Non-flammable, non-toxic, non-corrosive
gas; 5.1
OXIDIZING SUBSTANCE
special provisions: 100
IMO CLASSIFICATION: 2.2, 5.1
ICAO CLASSIFICATION: 2, 5.1
PACKING GROUP: x

*** SECTION 15. REGULATORY INFORMATION ***

**WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM
(WHMIS) **

PROPOSED WHMIS CLASSIFICATION:

A – Compressed gas
C – Oxidizing material
WHMIS HEALTH EFFECTS:

Does not meet criteria
WHMIS INGREDIENT DISCLOSURE LIST:
Does not meet criteria
DETAILED WHMIS CLASSIFICATION ACCORDING TO CRITERIA:

CLASS A – COMPRESSED GAS: Meets criteria; critical temperature:
-119 degC

CLASS B – FLAMMABLE & COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL: Does not meet criteria

CLASS C – OXIDIZING MATERIAL: Meets criteria
CLASS D – POISONOUS AND INFECTIOUS MATERIAL. DIVISION 1 – IMME
DIATE AND SERIOUS TOXIC EFFECTS:Does not meet criteria.
Acute Lethality: Does not meet criteria
CLASS D – POISONOUS AND INFECTIOUS MATERIAL. DIVISION 2 OTHER
TOXIC EFFECTS: Probably does not meet criteria. Toxicity informa
tion is incomplete but known toxic effects occur only at high
concentrations(continuous exposure above 50%).
CLASS E – CORROSIVE MATERIAL: Does not meet criteria
CLASS F – DANGEROUSLY REACTIVE MATERIAL: Does not meet criteria

OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION EVALUATION:
Meets criteria for hazardous material, as defined by 29 CRF
1910.1200.

*** SECTION 16. OTHER INFORMATION ***

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:
(1) Braker,W; Mossman, A.L.Oxygen. In: Matheson gas data book.
6th edition. Lyndhurst, NJ,1980. p. 562-569

(2) Beart, R.R. Inorganic compounds of oxygen, nitrogen,and
carbon. In: clayton, G.D.; Clayton, F.E., eds. Patty’s industrial
hygiene and toxicology. 3rd revised edition. Vol.2C: toxicology.
New York, NY; Toronto, Ontario: John Wiley ans Sons, Inc., 1982.
p.4053-4067

(3) Goodman and Gilman’s: the pharmacological basis of therapeut
ics. 7th ed. Macmillan publishing Co., 1985.p. 322-333

(4) 1054-1056
Information on chemicals reviewed in the CHEMINFO database is
drawn from a number of publicly available sources. A list of
general references used to compile CHEMINFO records is available
in the database Help.

REVIEW/PREPARATION DATE
REVISION INDICATORS: 1986-08-20

PEL-TWA; 1993-03
WHMIS (PROPOSED CLASS); 1993-03
OSHA evaluation: 1993-03
Trans PEL-TWA; 1993-04

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